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The Psymily Story

Many years ago psychology major and film school dropout, Kirk Cameron produced an Emmy winning visual sequence for the first season of NBC’s medical drama “ER”. For the next few years of his career in motion graphics design Kirk was constantly requested by clients to “make our visuals look like E.R.”

“It became so ridiculous that I joked around in the design world about creating software that would automatically generate Emmy winning graphics. Just plug in a new show title and a few tonal queues and out comes a fully rendered sequence.” The tongue-in-cheek joke was implausible and more of a statement about the limited vision of many Hollywood entertainment clients.

About the time he started obsessively thinking about the real possibilities of automated design, the selfie phenomenon exploded to Cameron’s consternation. Having always had a fascination with psychology and sociology Cameron began dissecting the mechanism of the popularity of selfies. “There is an obvious component of self expression to them but also some sort of self-validation. But what happens if you are looking for that validation but find that your self portrait just isn’t interesting or beautiful enough to cut through the noise of other selfie posts? It seemed dangerous to me. “

Automated design could be more useful and meaningful as a personal tool rather than a design tool. “I realized that all of my passions could make something that is socially beneficial,” recalls Cameron. “If selfies are an extension of personality and self why not make automated design a fun way to make that self-extension a richer and deeper experience? “

It didn’t take long for the self analysis front end of the concept to give the automated design backend the information input needed to generate unique graphic designs. The concept was coming together into a defined product.

Cameron turned to a colleague from previous project, a Christian media portal. Web developer Jason Boring had built the complex platform from scratch utilizing Drupal, ImageMagick, and Open CV. Utilizing Drupal and other open source libraries made rapid prototyping and functionality more efficient, while at the same time allowing us to scale as needed.

Actual, accredited psychology theory powers the tangled algorithm equations which the partners anthropomorphize as the female entity “Psym”. Based on the State-Trait Emotional Measure, a test used by major corporations to derive personality profiles of potential employees, Psym tracks 9 different polar axes of basic emotions. “You have for instance ratios of joy-to-despair, fear-to-comfort, or social-to-antisocial that are all tracked in the Psymily attitude surveys. Then all of those emotions are distilled down into one predicted attitude marker,” gushes Cameron.

As it stands now the platform is just the Game Mode of Psymily, one of several upcoming modes and feature sets that range from lightly silly to deeply personal and profound. “I’m most excited about Diary Mode. It will allow for visual personal journaling, something that could augment a written diary in a powerful way. You can then swipe through timelines of collages to recall moments, feelings, seasons.” explains Cameron.

Ultimately though, the vision for Psymily is much greater than an app. “We’ve always believed that the structure of Psymily could be used for psychologists to better understand patients that can not or will not share their emotional states. This could include pediatric and adult autistic spectrum disorders and possibly even Alzheimer’s.”

Psymily is growing by word-of-mouth propagation. It was decided early on that developing the platform would always be more important than marketing. Organic growth spurts are observed in various areas at different times. “It’s pretty easy to find people that think Psymily is cool. Psym has something for everyone.”

Many years ago psychology major and film school dropout, Kirk Cameron produced an Emmy winning visual sequence for the first season of NBC’s medical drama “ER”. For the next few years of his career in motion graphics design Kirk was constantly requested by clients to “make our visuals look like E.R.”

“It became so ridiculous that I joked around in the design world about creating software that would automatically generate Emmy winning graphics. Just plug in a new show title and a few tonal queues and out comes a fully rendered sequence.” The tongue-in-cheek joke was implausible and more of a statement about the limited vision of many Hollywood entertainment clients.

But the challenge of such software continued to rattle around in Cameron’s head. “In the digital design market there is a pattern where a breakthrough design look or technique is lauded. A few months later a Photoshop or After Effects plugin would become available that automates much of the look or technique. Each time it seems to cheapen the value of the hard work designers actually perform to get those breakthrough looks. Today you can order your graphics templates from an online menu.”

Cameron wanted out of motion graphics and began producing user experience design and doing a little teaching in visual aesthetics. Since then, computing firepower and connectivity caught up to the vision of Cameron’s automated design joke. Real-time graphics rendering and big data algorithms were now readily available to everyone.

“As I lectured about aesthetics I realized that there are a handful of very simple design principles that are rather binary and should not be broken unless absolutely necessary. You can start to create something that feels like actual design when you adhere to those guidelines alone,” Cameron claims. “So that’s just an algorithm.”

Somewhat obsessively, Cameron decided to spend some time really thinking about what that algorithm would look like and how it would behave. “I tested some concepts by building automated batch actions in Photoshop. The images were not always very elegant but it worked.”

Then the selfie phenomenon exploded to Cameron’s consternation. Having always had a fascination with psychology and sociology Cameron began dissecting the mechanism of the popularity of selfies. “Honestly, I hated the concept of selfies but it was clear that they were not going away. There is an obvious component of self expression to them but also some sort of self-validation test that happens every time someone posts their likeness. But what happens if you are looking for that validation but find that your self portrait just isn’t interesting or beautiful enough to cut through the noise of other selfie posts? It seemed dangerous to me. “

Right about the time that the selfie stick became a hot product Cameron was in the process of filing a patent for the automated design algorithms. Then, he had an epiphany that would switch the course of his thinking. Automated design could be more useful and meaningful as a personal tool rather than a design tool. “I realized that all of my passions for photography, design and psychology could all come together to make something that is socially beneficial,” recalls Cameron. “If selfies are an extension of personality and self why not make automated design a fun way to make that self-extension a richer and deeper experience? “

It didn’t take long for the self analysis front end of the concept to give the automated design backend the information input needed to generate unique graphic designs. The concept was coming together into a defined product. With some provocation from lawyers in his family Cameron looked to intellectual property law firm Patterson-Sheriden to guide and finesse Cameron’s process into a formal patent. In the process they were shocked to find very little protected “prior art” in existence.

Cameron remembers, “I’ve written many creative and technical papers in my life but writing the process in a patent filing format that Patterson-Sheriden could use was the hardest writing assignment I’ve ever attempted. The form and style for patent writing is highly unnatural to me, perhaps to everyone. You have to communicate unique and complex concepts without the use of adjectives, adverbs and pronouns.” But detailing the mechanics of the process proved to be valuable for the next step, executing the concept.

Cameron built a mockup prototype of the product in iWeb. iWeb? Really? “It’s all I knew how to use at the time that could work online. And since Apple had obsoleted the application it forced me to work on a legacy desktop machine to make it happen.”

And user testing began.

Cameron recalls the rough start of development with name and brand changes as well as losing a potential co-founder. “The brand and concept work was something I could do mostly on my own but all of the technical development was clearly outside of my capabilities. I obsessed entirely too long on finding a good name that also had an available domain. I sorely needed a development partner that was brilliant, fast, and then also available.”

After a botched ramp up with a friend from church under the moniker Roar Shack, a play on the name of ink spot psychology tests, Cameron turned to a colleague from previous project, a Christian media portal. Web developer Jason Boring had built the complex platform from scratch utilizing Drupal, ImageMagick, and Open CV. Utilizing Drupal and other open source libraries made rapid prototyping and functionality more efficient, while at the same time allowing us to scale as needed.

The partners knew that people would want to include their own selfies into the automated design engine. This would require the invention of a custom tool that could isolate the foreground selfie face from the background, a formidable task.

By this time Cameron finally rested on the name and domain “Psymily” combining the concept that the automated design collages are to be similes of the people they represent with the idea of a smile found on most selfies. The spelling with a “P-S-Y” represents the psychology behind the algorithms.

And it is true psychology that actually powers the tangled equations which the partners anthropomorphize as the female entity “Psym”. Based on the State-Trait Emotional Measure, a test used by major corporations to derive personality profiles of potential employees, Psym tracks 9 different polar axes of basic emotions. “You have for instance ratios of joy-to-despair, fear-to-comfort, or social-to-antisocial that are all tracked in the Psymily attitude surveys. Then all of those emotions are distilled down into one predicted attitude marker,” gushes Cameron. “We are always looking at the data in and out and making little nudges in Psym but have been pretty pleased with her accuracy so far.”

After building the operational prototype and subsequent minimum viable product it was obvious to Cameron and the board of advisors for the project that Boring understood and displayed great passion for the technology and vision behind what was now called Psymily. Boring was made CTO and co-founder. >

Psymily initially launch in February 2014 in a “friends & family” test phase. Since then the platform has had two restarts for some product evolution before being opened to the public.

As it stands now the platform is just the Game Mode of Psymily, one of several upcoming modes and feature sets that range from lightly silly to deeply personal and profound. “I’m most excited about Diary Mode. It will allow for visual personal journaling, something that could augment a written diary in a powerful way. You can then swipe through timelines of collages to recall moments, feelings, seasons. Diary Mode would obviously have much more serious lines of questioning,” explains Cameron.

Apart from upcoming features and modes, Cameron’s ultimate vision for Psymily is much greater than an app. Throughout the initial development and through all of the growth there has always been a singular focus of great importance. “We’ve always believed that the structure of Psymily could be used for psychologists to better understand patients that can not or will not share their emotional states. This could include pediatric and adult autistic spectrum disorders and possibly even Alzheimer’s. We need a TON of data to validate our associations to be able to get there, though.”

Psymily is growing by word-of-mouth propagation. It was decided early on that developing the platform would always be more important than marketing. Organic growth spurts are observed in various areas at different times. “When the cosplay community started sharing Psymilies it was exciting for us since cosplayers are such creative and outgoing people generally. But it’s pretty easy to find people that think Psymily is cool. Psym has something for everyone.”

Writing Tools

From cave paintings to Emojis, we want our feelings known, but not for the egotistical reason you might think.

We post and publish our vulnerable, exposed selves to Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat’s brutal global stage where we might get criticized and disapproved, or worse, totally ignored. Why do we subject ourselves to such potential abuse more than 40 million times each day? Is it just the ego’s need for recognition? To inform friends and strangers about how interesting our lives are? Or is it to inform and change our own selves?

Internally we understand that we are beautiful and interesting people but often need the viewpoint of others in order to see ourselves more accurately.

Emotional Intelligence or EQ is a modern behavior theory suggesting that emotional information is just as important as knowledge when understanding and dealing with ourselves and those around us. But EQ doesn’t work without information feeding back to the querying person.

Comments from friends or at least a thumbs-up approval is the data we need to make evaluate ourselves. However it is increasingly more difficult to stand out amid the ocean of airbrushed gold-standard, Kim Kardashian selfies and her mini Twitter exposés. Shock value is rewarded with highly coveted trend traction.

We are so unsure of our selves that we re-tweet quotations of other people that we believe to be more uniquely interesting or more profound than ourselves. Because we are too afraid to ask a stranger to photograph our wacky grimaces awkward selfie sticks have become necessary to get the unique camera angles necessary to draw comments in various newsfeeds.

Now a new app comes to celebrate the uniqueness inside people rather than the sameness of duck-lips and cleavage. Psymily analyses your personality and generates a one-of-a-kind visual simile representing your current state of mind. And Psymily is as unique as the people that use it.

Theme or issue-centered survey questions present a word or phrase prompt with four images. The player has only a few seconds to mentally create a relationship and select which of the four possible images he/she thinks is most closely associated with the concept or issue. It’s simple. It’s weird. It’s fun.

In the background a set of algorithms correlates the user’s associations to eighteen states of emotion. The feelings tracked are loosely based on a human resources personality survey called the State-Trait Emotional Measure or STEM. Psymily’s founders have anthropomorphized the algorithms into therapist-like entity they call Psym.

“She measures the balances between basic and opposing feelings like joy vs grief or fear vs security. She records a profile of all of these state-traits and makes some guesses about your personality and humanity as a whole,” amorously explains Kirk Cameron, Psym’s creator. “People have a lot of fun with her so we hope Psymily will become the Lumosity of he heart rather than the brain.”

It’s not magic nor PsyD degree understanding. A giant and expanding spreadsheet is all that is really driving all of the analysis Psym applies to multi-subjective concepts like human emotions. But don’t suggest to Cameron that Psymily is just math. “I think Psym will get smarter while she gets to know more humans.”

Co-founder and CTO Jason Boring was tasked with programming the gears in Psym’s virtual analytical mind as well as developing the user experience design. “____________________”

Then there are the Psymily collages, the bizarre abstract imagery Psym generates. All of the emotional state data from the survey is associated with other keyword concepts and correlated with other imagery. Along with the user’s selfie portrait Psym’s logic selects photos, artwork, colors, text, effects, textures and other graphics layers then renders the collected elements into a single composite image; an INNER selfie. The results are, well, weird and abstract and often quite accurate according to her users.

“Psym doesn’t create art… yet,” admits Cameron. “She’s using some very basic design rules right now.” And Cameron should know. Having produced the Emmy winning title sequence for NBC’s TV series “ER” he has spent many years with gifted designers and artists. “We’ll get better and hopefully get some respect from the human-generated art world.”

The collages beg to be understood. Psymilies are shared among friends on social networks for friends to interpret the possible meaning and visual metaphors embedded in the inner selfies. “We are inspiring online conversations at deeper levels than ‘Yo. ‘sup’ and hope that those engagements will lead to Emotional Intelligence and more meaningful relationships among friends,” says Cameron.

We love to express ourselves online but often lack the confidence to throw our selves into a vulnerable space. We know we will be judged and those judges, often online friends, can be brutal and cruel. So we insist on swallowing these confusing feelings so we can know ourselves better.

But let’s face it… get it? Face? Anyway, not all of us are as striking as an airbrushed Kim Kardashian. But most of us, maybe all of us are more interesting than Kim K. So why not flaunt what’s inside? After all, Mom always said the inside is most important.

And yes. I get it. Not all of us feel capable of creating unique and interesting images to show off to the world. Or maybe we don’t know how to use image editing apps like Photoshop to help us get our feelings onto canvas… or pixels in this case.

Along comes this weird and fun, but mostly weird app called Psymily. Psymily measures traits in your personality and then generates a visualization of your current mood and attitude. People call the strange collages “INNER selfies.” And they can be strange.

A Psymily user named “IndependentDarkness” says, “It's really cool! I love how you get the chart of your mood along with the picture. The results have actually been pretty accurate for me personally.”

Yes, strangely, “Psym,” the algorithm brain behind the art/psychology project, can be spot-on accurate and help you get some insight to the most interesting person you know… YOU! “Even I am sometimes surprised at the visual associations Psym picks for people,” says founder Kirk Cameron, Psym’s algorithm brain surgeon. “We’ve heard some great feedback from Psymily people that asked if we were spying on them or looking into their private chats.”

Don’t worry. They don’t do creepy things like that. Psymily’s makers don’t connect usernames and email addresses to actual people. But Psym will get to know you the more you engage with her. “Humans are very complex beasts. With a human new to Psymily, Psym is mostly guessing at first. But if you have an account to store your surveys and you are honest she will start understanding the rhythm of your state-traits and perhaps help you understand yourself better.”

Surveys are how you engage with Psymily and the questions are weird. Trying to use as few written words as possible the web app asks you to make visual associations with concepts, people and issues. The image-based questions are abstract to a point where every option could be correct. Since all of the options are plausible, you are forced to decide which option is the most appropriate. “You can’t think about how to answer for too long or you will get confused and, thereby confuse Psym,” explains Kirk. “You just need to react to the images rather than analyze them thoroughly.”

Borrowing heavily from the State-Trait Emotional Measure, Psymily tracks 18 mind states on nine separate plot lines., then associates that data with other images.

“We plot opposing emotional states on the same axis. For instance, degrees of stress vs. relaxation are on the same line or feelings of fear vs. safety. It gets complicated when understanding how the energy and social acceptance of each trait effects all of the other emotional traits.” All of that psycho-tech theory runs in the background of Psymily, invisible to the player.

And just when you thought the surveys are weird, Psymily then “designs” a collage of imagery to represent what she “understands” about you. The quotes are there for a reason. Psym is just software and she really doesn’t understand or design anything the way a human would think and create. It’s all numbers on a giant layered chart in the cloud.

The generated inner selfies can contain layers of photos, drawings, icons, graphics, text, textures, colors, effects… you get the picture, right? But it’s up to you and your friends to understand what all of means to you.

And that is the purpose of all of this weirdness; getting friends to chat and talk at deeper levels. “It’s true that we’re more interconnected than ever but we are not necessarily more connected. Sadly, we are getting accustomed to sharing and understanding ourselves at only very superficial levels.”

Emotional Intelligence is a socio-psychology perspective that encourages the understanding of your own emotional states as well as identifying the moods of those around you. Psymily can help you and your friends get better at knowing and loving the uniqueness of yourselves.

Psymily is a safe platform where no personal information is shared between users. The art/psychology project is always looking for new contributors for data, imagery and ideas.

Art

The Selfie vs. Self Portrait debate has raged since the 15th Century and started somewhere between painters Jan van Eyck’s and Albrecht Dürer’s self-aggrandizing self-portraits. Through the next 600 years celebrated artists such as Van Gough and Frida Kahlo refined, but blurred the line of “art” by making their own likeness the subject of their masterpieces. Critics have sparred ever since and have never really resolved the pure-purpose versus narcissism issue.

And then selfies saturated human culture.

Neither distinguished art critics nor Kim Kardashian have yet figured out what delineates a selfie from a self-portrait. Maybe they are the same. Clearly both can be conceived from ego-centric sincerity. Additionally, they both communicate and represent some purposeful message of the “artist.” Improper composition or bad aesthetics cannot be dis-qualifiers. Similarly a self portrait does not require tedious amounts of labor to be considered a work of art, although Kim K’s airbrushing is a full-time job.

Kirk Cameron has an obsession with these paradoxes. A frustrated artist and film school dropout with a 15-year career in film, design, photography and marketing, Cameron has had plenty of time to ruminate and split hairs in the infinite gray area where art, commerce and self-expression collide. This swampy space allows for wonderful accidents and happenstance to birth art from junk… and vice versa.

“In working with huge amounts of truly gifted artisans as well as a handful of artsy charlatans pretending to be truly gifted, I noticed that quite a lot of unintentional accidents become perfect art and design blessings that communicate the message better than our original predicted solutions. There’s nothing better than working with focused creative talent but I also like to encourage focused trainwrecks as well. And when that magic happens and even wins critical acclaim and awards I wonder if what we accidentally fabricated could be considered art or even design. We allowed happenstance to tell our story,” Cameron

Our stories, our insatiable desire for self-expression is natural and vital for humans. More than 50,000,000 user generated media such as selfies are created each day. Some arise from the masses as seemingly brilliant works of art. But from crude petroglyphs to Frida Kalos, some people seem to be better at it than others. Some makers are relegated to artist status. Their stories are told and retold through social network sharing.

And so we’re back to Kim K….

It’s easy to disregard selfies as simple, lazy narcissism. They are just the ego’s need for recognition. Or perhaps it’s just a quick way to show friends and strangers how interesting we want them to believe our lives might be. But what if billions of selfies are made in order to inform and change our own selves? We crave feedback to validate our self-expression.

Cameron warns, “Selfies can be dangerous. People deliberately make a likeness of themselves, then APPROVE IT as an accurate representation and ultimately throw it up on the net for brutal public commentary. Sometimes you will get positive comments and “likes”. Sometimes you will get teased or bullied. But worst of all is when your likeness is ignored… maybe never even seen. It can call into question if you really exist.”

Cameron wanted to help people tell these important stories, especially the makers that are unaware of basic design principles. Or perhaps they don’t have Photoshop nor have Kim K’s backside. His believes he can help casual mobile self-portrait makers (selfie people) nudge the odds to make thought provoking selfies more often and be lifted up to artist esteem. They would then have a better chance to be noticed, receive feedback, and therefore, grow as individuals. And thus, The Psymily Project was born.

Psymily is an “INNER selfie generator” based on Emotional Intelligence models and the State-Trait Emotional Measure, a profile test by which human resources at large corporations discover personality nuances in new hires. Somewhat analogous to the design process Psymily takes in many different axes of user mindfulness and, using some basic design rules, extrapolates a visual collage to represent the user’s attitude. The mindfulness data is collected through very abstract visual association surveys that are often as strange as the inner selfiePsymily collages.

Cameron teamed up with colleague Jason Boring, now CTO of The Psymily Project, who crafted the concept into a real entity, or at least many, many lines of code and algorithm that seems like an entity they now anthropomorphize as “Psym.”

“I know Psym will never be an artist but I hope she’s learning some things about both design and humanity. One day it would be great for her to pass through the “uncanny valley” of the Turing Test where her creations are indistinguishable from other modern artists. But she needs to collect millions, perhaps billions of human proclivity data points to gain that experience and understanding,” dreams Cameron. “Psym could really shatter our definition of art.”

Boring explains that behind Psym is really just a vast array of inter-related spreadsheets and databases. All of the emotional state data from the surveys are associated with other keyword concepts and then correlated with other imagery containing similar concept inheritance. Along with the user’s selfie portrait Psym’s logic selects photos, artwork, colors, text and other graphic layers to render into a single composite collage. The results are, well, weird and abstract but often quite accurate and telling.“She’s making a lot of guesses right now but will theoretically get more accurate as she whittles through aesthetic judgement.”

But there are times when a user will ask how Psymily knows so much about them. “I get excited but honestly a little creeped out when Psym finds a high order detail of her human subjects. More important than Psym learning the nature of humans is that people learn more about the nature of their own selves. If a Psymily user doesn’t take the time to ponder the provocative questions, to share their collage and get feedback from friends, then hey are just playing a game,” admits Cameron.

The Psymily Project is closing in on collage number 250,000 generated… or dare I say created by Psymily. Some are brilliant. Some have high-order insight. Most are weird. But all of the collages demand us to refine our understanding of art and self.

The Psymily project is splitting hairs. Part tool. Part confidant. Part teacher. Part game. It’s hard to know exactly what the Psymily project is or does. But if you aren’t yet sure where selfies reside in the art/junk debate, Psymily will just dig that gray rabbit hole a little deeper.

Please take a look and contribute your personality proclivities to The Psymily Project. Previously generated collages are available in the Psymily gallery.

http://psymily.com

Images

Bios

As creative director and producer in mixed-media design for his creative firm, Subtext Semantics, Kirk spearheads film, television and marketing projects from development through release. Recently Kirk was instrumental in branding and launching Truli.com, a Christian content and entertainment network. His work in investor relations helped transform the platform into a publically traded entity. For more than 15 years the Emmy-winning producer has worked with the entertainment industry’s top studios, filmmakers and marketers on many complex creative and development projects and has been covered in Creative Arts, ID Magazine, Variety, Hollywood Reporter and LA Times. He also serves as president of the Motion Graphics Advisory Board at Austin Community College.

Psymily is a convergence of Kirk’s favorite career disciplines… design, photography, technology, communication, and psychology.

An accomplished and experienced PHP developer specializing in developing, scaling and optimizing successful web applications, Jason has implemented many projects from concept using a diverse toolkit of technologies. He is always pushes best-practices for development and ensures a high level attention to detail in order to mitigate collisions and inefficiencies before they can occur. His PHP/PHP5 core competencies include website development platforms HTML, CSS, Javascript including jQuery, Ajax, XML, JSON (no relation) and W3C. Launch/Relaunches include Neiman Marcus, Fossil, WhichBox Media, Truli Media Group, Richardson Living, Ueber Music & Town Square Buzz. Jason is a winner of the Top 50 Innovators award at the New York Venture Summit

With more than 20 years of experience in venture investing, business operations and development, Chris served as Dir. of Strategic Investments for Intel Capital, responsible for enterprise & internet security/manageability technology investments, an average portfolio value $250+M. His regional focus included North and South America, Israel and China. Chris served as Intel's representative to nine private company Boards of Directors, where he helped build world-class companies. He completed 16 investments and advised on many more during his tenure at Intel Capital, investing in innovative companies such as NetScaler (Acquired by Citrix for $300M) and Oblix (Acquired by Oracle). Chris prepared groups for spin-out, spin-in and other M&A activities. Chris served as CEO of Vector Teknologies, Inc. as well as other senior operational positions. He spent four years in Japan managing public affairs for the USAF, is a restaurateur, and holds five technology patents. Chris graduated from the University of Maryland where he received his BS in Business.

Twenty years of legal experience with combined law firm and in-house positions, Keith is currently Group General Counsel of FDM Group Limited, an international IT consulting company based in England. As the Group General Counsel, Keith oversees the entire global legal function which covers over 10 countries in Europe, the Asia-Pacific region and North America. Prior to his position in England, Keith was Asst. General Counsel at Temple-Inland Inc., an international manufacturing company based in Austin. In that role he had a broad transactional practice and was part of a legal department that was named "Best of Business Attorneys" of 2006 by the Austin Business Journal. Keith started his career at the law firm Naman, Howell, Smith & Lee where he progressed to partner. His focus of practice was on litigation, appeals and telecommunications transactional work. He was board certified in Civil Appellate Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization.

Roger is a technology executive with over 20 years experience in executive management, marketing, product management, and business development for a range of companies – start-up to Fortune 500. He has launched multiple award-winning products. Roger has been involved in multiple mergers and acquisitions deals on both sides and has extensive international experience in Europe and Asia.. Roger earned his MBA from Duke University and undergraduate from Babson College .

Jeff is an Assistant Professor in the Graphic Design Department at GSU, where he teaches Graphic Design, Motion Design for Film and TV. He is a Creative Director, Writer Director, and Producer.Jeff Boortz’s impressive roster of current and past clients includes NBC Sports, Discovery Channel, Travel Channel, MTV, ESPN, HBO, CBS, NBC, FOX, Showtime, A&E, Telemundo, BRAVO, Court TV, Comcast, Charter Communications, Adelphia, Cox, Universal and others. Additionally, he designed over a dozen futuristic advertisements and interfaces for Steven Spielberg’s feature film Minority Report. Boortz’s renaissance spirit has led him into bold ventures, including the production of several socially oriented HD series for HDNet.

Brad has more than 20 years of experience in computer-based video. He began his career creating video editing hardware and software in the early 1990's for Fast Multimedia, and NewTek. While at NewTek he and the NewTek President & Founder started Instawatch, one of the world's first streaming video companies in 2000. Since then he has been involved in multiple companies providing streaming video services. Brad is currently employed by AT&T where he develops and manages www.uverse.com, one of the industry's largest media portals with more than 240,000 television shows, movies, and music videos.

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